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Friday, September 7, 2012

thoughts on: Happier at Home

Happier at Home: Kiss More, Jump More, Abandon a Project, Read Samuel Johnson, and My Other Experiments in the Practice of Everyday LifeHappier at Home: Kiss More, Jump More, Abandon a Project, Read Samuel Johnson, and My Other Experiments in the Practice of Everyday Life by Gretchen Rubin

When I read complaints about Gretchen Rubin's original Happiness Project or her new Happier at Home, they center around her having an ideal or enchanted life.  In some ways, this is true.  She is not writing about finding happiness amidst financial or marital struggles.  She is not trying to be happy in a career or location she hates.  She is not trying to overcome major adversities in her life.  However, she is not giving advice to people in those situations.

She is writing to those, like her, who know they have good lives, and want to feel it - people who find themselves grumbling about minor inconveniences or find their moods determined by perceived slights and difficulties, and know they should be happier than they currently feel.

Taken for what it is, Happier at Home is an engaging book.  I found Rubin much easier to relate to in this book than the last.  She is still a determined Type A, but she seems a bit more vulnerable, more real, more likable.  Her life is unlike my own, yet I appreciated reading about her efforts at enjoying the here and now, savoring these moments, not rushing to the next or romanticizing the past.  Even if her methods do not appeal to me, her goal does.

2 comments:

Missus Wookie said...

Oh as another driven type A who so related to Gretchen in the first book (and has this one on preorder at Amazon) I'm glad to hear that this is going a bit deeper. I was hoping so.

Lynn said...

I have not read her, but may look at this book now. Happiness is a choice and sounds like Rubin is showing how you can make that choice in your everyday life.